“Fun House” at the National Building Museum, and “For Love of Place” at Freer Gallery

Fun House at the National Building Museum

This is something you HAVE to see.  Take a day off work. You won’t regret it!

At the National Building Museum this Summer resides their bold exhibition “Fun House,” by Snarkitecture. This interactive exhibition is a part of the museum’s “Summer Block Party” series of temporary structures that are set up in the Great Hall of the museum. Curated by Maria Christina Didero, the exhibit consists of some well-known Snarkitecture designs and objects, as well as new concepts created for Summer Block Party. Keeping theme with the typical Snarkitecture all white designs, the exhibit includes a large pool filled with hundreds of thousands of recyclable balls  “THE BEACH,” and “Playhouse,” a larger than life white unfinished house as the centerpiece of the Museum. Snarkitecture, a design firm based out of New York, has designed exhibitions for the National Building Museum in the past. However nothing has come close in scale or significance to Fun House.

 

DC Refined

Architectural Record

ArchDaily

ArchDaily

KidFriendly DC

The National Building Museum will host Fun House through September 2nd, making it a perfect artistic and  family-friendly day out.

 

For the Love of Place

Another find while touring DC would be this:  Att the Freer Gallery on DC’s National Mall right now there resides a collection of ancient Japanese folding screens. “For Love of Place” brings Japanese landscape paintings on folding screens back to the forefront. Termed “place” painting, or the painting of a natural landscape, these screens have held a prominent position in Japanese art since ancient times and remain a staple of Japanese culture today. On display through November, this gallery’s selection of snow-themed paintings suggests one way that these works may have been used: to create an ambiance of heat-deflecting cool. “For Love of Place” offers visitors a unique art form rarely seen in the western world, and is a must see exhibit for those who fancy themselves art connoisseurs.

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Some may wonder how a modern American audience can relate to paintings used by ancient Japanese folk to shade themselves from the sun. To that I can only attest to the beauty of the art itself, and how something as practical as a screen can be made to look so attractive. As an interior designer, this is an issue that often comes up in my line of work. The purpose of furniture, curtains and kitchens is inherently practical, but it is the job of the artist to make the practical beautiful. After all, a life void of beauty is a life not worth living.

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

Hope you are having a great summer.

Stay Inspired,

The Margery Wedderburn Interiors Team

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